UNODC, Global Report on Trafficking in Persons 2012

The Global Report on Trafficking in Persons 2012 released by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) provides an overview of patterns and flows of trafficking in persons at global, regional and national levels, based on trafficking cases detected between 2007 and 2010 or more recent cases.
The report has revealed that 27 per cent of all victims of human trafficking officially detected globally between 2007 and 2010 are children, up 7 per cent from the period 2003 to 2006. The findings include an increase in the number of girl victims, who make up two thirds of all trafficked children. Based on official data supplied by 132 countries, girls now constitute 15 to 20 per cent of the total number of all detected victims, including adults, whereas boys comprise about 10 per cent. Within this picture, there are significant regional variations. While the share of detected child victims is 68 per cent in Africa and the Middle East, and 39 per cent in South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, that proportion diminishes to 27 per cent in the Americas and 16 per cent in Europe and Central Asia.
The report also raises concerns about low conviction rates - 16 per cent of reporting countries did not record a single conviction for trafficking in persons between 2007 and 2010. On a positive note, 154 countries have ratified the United Nations Trafficking in Persons Protocol, of which UNODC is the guardian. Significant progress has been made in terms of legislation, as 83 per cent of countries now have a law that criminalizes trafficking in persons in accordance with the Protocol.

Published 2013-01-03

Document Information

Publication year
2012
Format
pdf, 104p.
Rights
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)
Creative Commons License
None
Content Type
Reports
Identifier
ISBN: 978-92-1-055896-9

Document Information

Publication year
2012
Format
pdf, 104p.
Rights
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)
Creative Commons License
None
Content Type
Reports
Identifier
ISBN: 978-92-1-055896-9