Hearing the Voices of Children in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique

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Publication year:

2021

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English

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Format:

pdf (1.1 MiB)

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Publisher:

Save the Children International,Save the Children Mozambique

The armed conflict in the northern province of Cabo Delgado has caused hundreds of thousands of children and their families to flee their homes, often having to leave with nothing but the clothes on their backs. It is estimated that over 1/3 of the province’s population has been displaced across Cabo Delgado and into neighboring Nampula and Niassa provinces. As of April 2021, an estimated 772,000 Mozambicans, including nearly 348,000 children, are currently in temporary accommodation, either in IDP (internally displaced persons) camps or with family and friends, or have been moved by the government into new resettlement sites, where they will need to completely restart their lives. 

Children have been deeply traumatised by the violence and upheaval and require a range of support to help them recover. While the different actors, including the Government of Mozambique, the national and international humanitarian community, and civil society organizations are coordinating their efforts as best as possible, it is critical that the response efforts are guided by the needs and concerns of children. As such, SCI has spoken directly with affected children in an effort to capture their thoughts, opinions, concerns, and needs firsthand.

This paper provides in-depth insights from children who have been directly impacted by the conflict and makes recommendations about what interventions should be implemented for children and with children. Children, regardless of their circumstances, have duties and rights, and should be active participants in making decisions that shape their futures, rather than simple beneficiaries of assistance efforts.

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